Gastronomía

The history of Ibiza cannot be understood without its fishing activity. Thanks to archaeologists, we now know that even in Phoenician and Carthaginian times there was organized fishing. The industry escalated under the Romans, who set up factories to preserve fish and garum – the ketchup of the day, made from fish flesh and innards – products which were then...

Few elements demonstrate the cultural mélange of the Ibicenco people as palpably as their gastronomy. Ibiza was inhabited by Phoenicians, Carthaginians, Romans, Moors and Catalonians, among other civilizations, all of whom left their mark in the form of a unique culinary heritage. Despite the passing of centuries and the development of taste preferences and available produce, this legacy is still...

Much of a restaurant’s magic resides in the market produce that goes into prepping its menu. The quality of these ingredients, in turn, depends on securing trustworthy suppliers, who can guarantee steady deliveries and the top quality we require. At Es Torrent, we have quite a few direct suppliers (fishermen, farmers, olive growers, butchers, etc.) but, mostly, we go to...

In bygone days, the people of Ibiza organized their existence around laying in enough food to sustain them. Summer constituted the most fertile time of year and farmers developed a multitude of techniques to preserve the season’s bounty so that it would tide them through the winter. One of the best examples of their resourcefulness can be found in the...

The scorpion fish (Scorpaena scrofa), on the island known as ‘roja’, is one of the tastiest fish in Ibiza. Many fishermen have felt the effects of its poison when trying to release it from the hook once caught. They usually end up with a very swollen hand and one has to be very skillful to release it, putting the thumb...

It often happens in gastronomy that improvisation and fortuity are cited as the inspiration for some of the world’s most iconic dishes. How, for example, did anyone ever come up with the idea of crushing garlic in a mortar, adding a slow trickle of oil and stirring constantly until aioli formed? And, was it really a case of absent-mindedness that...

Gourmets have long appreciated the excellence of the Ibicenco potato. We islanders are big fans of the tuber and grow it in large quantities, both for our own use as well as for commercial outlet in markets, hotels and restaurants. Ibiza’s irrigated lands – stunning in their reddish hues that range from ochre to garnet – are rich in iron...

Ibiza, like other parts of the world with indigenous breeds of livestock, has its own cheese-making tradition, one whose distinctive varieties are different from all others. In days gone by, it was the custom in all houses where animals were raised to make cheese, natural and full of flavorful. It was sometimes eaten fresh and sometimes left to cure until...